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MOBILITY TROOP RE-SUPPLY’ by Stuart Brown A sentry keeps watch as a heavily armed SAS fighting column is re-supplied by a Royal Air Force Chinook of 7 Sqn. Re-supplies such as these, often performed under the cover of darkness, allow Special Forces to operate deep behind enemy lines for months at a time where necessary. Equipped with long wheelbase Land Rovers, Mercedes Unimog support vehicle and motorcycle outriders, a highly mobile fighting column is able to mount surprise attacks on enemy positions or operate covertly to gather intelligence.

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‘TEAMWORK’ by Stuart Brown Aircraft of the UK’s Special Forces flight perform an ‘ALARP’ exercise on an MoD range at Pendine Sands, Wales. Commissioned by 47 Squadron of UKSF flight. The Air Land Refuel Points (ALARP) can be located on improvised airfields or beaches and normally operate at night with the aid of Night Vision Goggles. The aircraft portrayed are a 47 Sqn Hercules refuelling a 7 Sqn Chinook and a 657 Sqn AAC Lynx. Special Forces personnel provide armed cover.

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‘EXPLOSIVE ENTRY’ by Stuart Brown Members of a Special Air Service Counter Terrorism team execute an ‘explosive entry’ armed with Heckler & Koch MP5 automatic weapons, 9mm pistols and assault grenades. Available as a limited edition of 850 artist signed prints. 500 prints are countersigned by the following former members of the SAS who took part in the infamous storming of the Iranian Embassy siege in London, May 1980:

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'CPL BRYAN BUDD VC' Cpl Bryan Budd of 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment assaults a Taliban position near Sangin, Afghanistan on 20th August 2006 to allow the recovery of wounded men. For this selfless act, and in recognition of his inspirational leadership and supreme valour, Cpl Budd was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

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'AL WAKI' by Stuart Brown 1 Squadron RAF Regiment engage enemy insurgents during a ferocious firefight, Basrah, Iraq 2007. Commissioned by the RAF Regiment, 'Al Waki' is now available as a limited edition of 650 artist signed prints reproduced from the original oil painting. A special edition of 50 prints are countersigned by Air Commodore Steven Abbott, Commandant General Royal Air Force Regiment and Corporal David Hayden MC.

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'JOINT OPERATIONS' by Stuart Brown Jordan’s 61 SRR Snipers provide air cover from a UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter of 30 Special Operations Aviation Group.

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'PRIVATE MICHELLE NORRIS MC' by Stuart Brown Serving as a Medical Orderly attached to 1st Battalion Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, 19-year-old Private Michelle Norris climbs onto a Warrior armoured vehicle, under sustained sniper fire, to treat the gravely wounded commander. For her selfless bravery Private Norris became the first female to be awarded the Military Cross. June 11th 2006, Al-Amarah, Iraq.

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‘COVERT INSERTION’ by Stuart Brown Members of 22 SAS regiment perform a HALO (High Altitude, Low Opening) freefall insertion from an altitude of 25,000 feet, typically equipped with oxygen, automatic weapons, Bergen packs and stabilised equipment container.

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'PENETRA LE TENEBRE - PENETRATE THE SHADOWS' by Stuart Brown Commissioned by 112th Signal Battalion. 'The heritage and lineage of the 112th Signal Battalion (Special Operations) (Airborne) can be traced back to World War II and the activation of the 512th Signal Company on 14 July 1944 in Lido De Roma, Italy. The 512th was established to provide signal support to the 1st Special Service Force and the Parachute Infantry Battalions that comprised the 1st Airborne Task Force. The 512th made the unit's first parachute and glider assaults into battle on 15 August 1944 during Operation DRAGOON. The Battalion motto: 'Penetra Le Tenebre' ('Penetrate the Shadows') draws from the 512th Signal Company's early service in Italy. Since reactivation on 17 September 1986, the Soldiers of the 112th Signal Battalion (Special Operations) (Airborne) continue to uphold and build upon the legacy of the 512th Signal Company. Continuously deployed since October 2001, Soldiers of the 112th Signal Battalion have operated in every theater of operation, providing cutting edge communications support to Special Operations Forces. Today, the 112th Signal Battalion continues the tradition of excellence as the Army's only Airborne Signal Battalion, and remains poised to maintain its reputation as the premier Signal organization in the United States Army.'

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'BLACK HAWK - SPECIAL DELIVERY' by Stuart Brown A Black Hawk MH-60K of the U.S. 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR) delivers a team of coalition Special Forces onto an Afghan mountain pass in the hunt for Taliban forces.

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'45 COMMANDO GROUP - OPERATION HERRICK' by Stuart Brown A foot patrol of 45 Commando Group moves through an Afghan hillside settlement as part of a regular show of presence during Operation Herrick.

On this page are photos of artwork completed by amazing people as a tribute to those who serve for their country.
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'IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE HINDU KUSH' by Stuart Brown Commissioned by the Household Cavalry Regiment. The Household Cavalry Regiment has been heavily committed to operations throughout Helmand, Southern Afghanistan since 2006, conducting long-range reconnaissance, security and stabilisation tasks. The painting depicts a reconnaissance patrol from HCR taking a short halt before last light, in an area typical of northern Helmand, near the key town of Musa Q’aleh. The scene shows a mixed patrol equipped with a variety of vehicles and weapon systems used by the Regiment including the Scimitar and Spartan CVR(T) and the Jackal 1. This painting is dedicated to those who did not make it back.

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